South End Kitchen Remodel

 

A 100 year old brownstone in the heart of the South End of Boston with a great kitchen to begin with…

 
 
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Right off the bat we knew the potential, but saw the obstacles. The kitchen didn’t fit the overall aesthetic of the house. The room was on the smaller side and needed to utilize space more efficiently.  When the clients came to us asking for a kitchen remodel for the home they just bought, they told us they wanted to build a kitchen that fit both their home and their lifestyle. After seeing all the room for improvement, we realized we had an opportunity to do something special.

 
 
 
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We decided to bring in some real traditional cabinetry with a bit of modern aesthetic. We wanted to make it look like the home was built around this kitchen, and not just a modern interpretation. Knowing how to utilize space would be key, and we quickly realized we would have to be extremely thoughtful when planning and designing for this space. Our collaboration with Melissa Miranda was a huge help in deciding on look and feel, and our designer, Amy Lynn, helped us figure out how to make the space function to its utmost ability. A lot of inspiration (and a little advice!) for this design came from Humphrey Munson Kitchens.

 
 
 

Part of our challenge was creating an aesthetic that matched the house and had the different elements play off of each other. We used inset, walnut interiors to provide some contrast to the white elements and create a more handsome look. We decided to use curved cabinetry by the patio door and living room entrance so that when you came in, you weren’t walking into a jagged, geometric edge. That decision went a long way to create a more soft, inviting feeling that organically flowed into the space.

 
 
 
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Amy went as far as to say it ‘hugged’ the room.
 
 
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We wanted the island to contrast the cabinets, but also look like a piece a furniture that belonged there, so we built it like a bank of drawers. When we were told there had to be a microwave, we knew we had to figure out how to hide it to keep the space elegant and refined. It was challenging, but we had this idea build two drawer fronts, attach them together, and then have it tuck away. It worked beautifully so that it would be there when in use, and then we could be hidden away to keep everything aesthetically pleasing. It was important to us to have these prominent corners look like one piece of wood, so we mitered the same piece of walnut for the vertical pieces of the panel and corner.

 
 
 

A unique detail Melissa came up with to compliment the curved cabinetry was a stack with a square bottom and a reverse corner round for the countertop. The backsplash was actually a man-made Neolith porcelain backsplash, intended to give a marble look and protect from the high heat of the range below.

 
 
 

To have the appliance wall stand out but not be overbearing, we decided to match the island because it was very separated and tucked in the corner. It features a freezer, refrigerator, and wine column. The wine column was designed to be either fully enclosed or have a glass panel, but everything we found was a solid door (meaning it just got cut out to match the glass). We wanted to build a truly symmetrical cabinet wall, but also gain the feature of the glass door for wine viewing. We wanted it to look as though the cabinet door was modified to allow you to look inside the fridge but feel as though it was always part of the space.

 
 
 
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To have the appliance wall stand out but not be overbearing, we decided to match the island because it was very separated and tucked in the corner. It features a freezer, refrigerator, and wine column. The wine column was designed to be either fully enclosed or have a glass panel, but everything we found was a solid door (meaning it just got cut out to match the glass). We wanted to build a truly symmetrical cabinet wall, but also gain the feature of the glass door for wine viewing. We wanted it to look as though the cabinet door was modified to allow you to look inside the fridge but feel as though it was always part of the space.

After a lot of thought, we actually decided to build a door, cut the panel out, and then center the glass in that panel to allow for viewing of the wine. We made sure to use the same wood piece to build verticals of the door and the door above, and did the same with the horizontals between to keep the flow and continuation of the grain. When you look closely, you’ll see the same grain flow through many pieces of the the rails and stiles on the cabinetry throughout all of the walnut pieces.

 
 
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We decided to make the wall around the sink stone, and to take the cabinets outs from between the windows, to let all the natural light in give it that clean look. We actually kept the range from the original kitchen, and plastered to make it part of the wall. We intercepted the original crown molding up top and allowed the range to be a box chimney style hood and let the cabinets die into it.

 
 
 
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As always, we were very happy to have the opportunity to push the team creatively while solving an issue, and just make something cool. Let us know what you think!

 
 

 
 
Projectdrew reilleyRenovations